It goes both ways.

Just when you lose faith in basic human kindness, you see something on the Internet that warms your heart.

A three-legged puppy finds a home with a loving family, a woman expresses a remarkable kind of love for her mom or a child on the other side of the world induces giggles in, say, Texas, from, perhaps, a newspaper editor having a terrible, horrible, no-good, very bad day.

And then, just when your faith in humanity is restored — wham. You see evidence of strangers being hateful to each other, right out in the open on the Internet.

Such was the case this week, when The Facts posted news of the death of former West Columbia police chief Michael Palmer.

Palmer, facing a Monday trial start in the case of several serious allegations of child rape, was found dead in his backyard on Thursday.

It’s information that clearly is newsworthy, and we reported it, as we did in our newspaper the next day, without bias or insult.

Some will argue we should not have posted it at all, and with them I disagree, but we all are entitled to our opinions.

The comments on the post were the hurtful part, sadly, as they are on most any story of any semi-polarizing topic on any media outlet’s social media account or website.

We delete those that contain profanity as quickly as we can, but we cannot legislate basic human kindness. That is up to users.

Personal, mean comments like those posted against supporters of Palmer, and the ones fired back by some who were hurt by those statements, could leave people forgetting that there is tons of good in the world, as well.

On my Facebook feed, at least, a bunch of yellow shirts on Friday helped turn the tide back to good.

The sunshine-yellow Demi’s Difference T-shirts worn Friday by people supporting one of Brazoria County’s latest charitable endeavors just brighten your day, period.

When you consider why so many people in the Angleton and Danbury area are wearing them now, it will warm your heart even more.

Demi is the daughter of Angleton lawyer and volunteer auctioneer Jarrod Smith and his wife Hayley, a teacher who now stays home with her kids.

She was born in October 2011 with a rare chromosome disorder, and she passed away on Dec. 1. Her death was unexpected, and the illness that took her was unknown.

Since then the couple has turned their unspeakable heartache into a vehicle for love, starting Demi’s Difference to raise money to help families of children going through medical troubles.

They want to do the little things people did for them, things like gift cards for gas to the hospital and parking once there, and Texas Children’s Hospital tells them there are plenty of needs.

Sales of the bright-yellow T-shirts are helping fund their cause, and a fundraiser planned for next Sunday should be a big boost, as well.

But the spirit of Demi’s Difference is reaching far beyond direct recipients of the aid the charity will provide.

The Smiths are asking people to wear their T-shirts on certain days, then post pictures of themselves in them on social media with the hashtag #demisdifference or #letyourlightshine.

And they’re promoting random acts of kindness, too. The trend has caught on fast, and there’s no telling how many good deeds have been done in Demi’s name already.

It’s another heartwarming reminder that there is good out there that far outweighs the bad, and that people of good will are responsible for sharing it.

Be the change you wish to see in the world.

Let your light shine.

Yvonne Mintz is editor of The Facts. Contact her at 979-237-0144 or yvonne.mintz@thefacts.com.

Yvonne Mintz is editor and publisher of The Facts. She has worked at the paper since 1997, first as a reporter, then as senior reporter and city editor before becoming managing editor in 2004.

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